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  • Asperger's Syndrome in Adults
  • Working To Come To Terms with Asperger's
  • Sex and Depression - The Real Story
  • The Loss of Joy: Anhedonia
  • All About Schizophrenia
  • Depression: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Asperger Syndrome is an Autism Spectrum Disorder (or Pervasive Developmental Disorder) characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. Those with Asperger Syndrome, or AS, may exhibit a lack of empathy for their peers, clumsiness, and atypical use of language, though none of these symptoms are required for a diagnosis.1

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The pain of coming to terms with having Asperger's is still very real for me right now. There is a tremendous sense of grief. Grief for all that I suffered through to try to be "normal" and grief for how short of "normal" I always have been. There is also great relief to know that I am not crazy and that not everything can be traced back to an abusive past in the sense that some of what I experience is not choice/emotional but neurons/physical. The greatest challenge I face right now is trying to figure out which is which. This is not easy.

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One of the most common side effects of a number of antidepressant medications is loss of sex drive. I could forgive our friends at fine companies such as Eli Lilly, Bristol Meyers Squibb, and Pfizer if dry mouth, irritability, disrupted sleep patterns, loss of appetite, sloth, and social phobia were the sole issues related to the medications I take on a daily basis. However, it is the sex thing I find most challenging.

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Sadness

Anhedonia is the technical term for the inability to experience joy. When people are in the depths of depression, nothing touches them, not the most intensely pleasurable activities, not the most familiar comforts. They are emotionally frozen. In this state, people either have to get professional help or simply wait for weeks or months until the depression lifts by itself; nothing is going to make them feel better.

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Schizophrenia is a mental illness which affects one person in every hundred.

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Depression is perhaps the most common of all mental health problems, currently felt to affect one in every four adults to some degree. Depression is a problem with mood/feeling in which the mood is described as sad, feeling down in the dumps, being blue, or feeling low. While the depressed mood is present, evidence is also present which reflects the neurochemical or "brain chemistry" aspects of depression with the depressed individual experiencing poor concentration/attention, loss of energy, accelerated thought/worry, sleep/appetite disturbance, and other physical manifestations. When this diagnosis is present, the individual will exhibit at least five of the following symptoms during the depressive periods:

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Menopause. The word is a scourge to many women. It is the shifting of one stage of life to another – from being a creator of life to a point where that is no longer possible. There are many changes which take place on the biological level which can lead to alterations in mood.

In addition to common symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, many women develop rapid mood changes, anger, and depression. These mood swings are the result of hormonal changes brought on by menopause. While there is no 'cure' for menopause as it is an entirely natural process, hormone therapy is recommended by some doctors. Even with available treatments to ease this potentially troubling period of time, it is necessary for women to learn to cope with the emotional fluctuations associated with menopause.

When a person is angry or depressed for an extended amount of time, and the menopause can last a number of years, it can lead to negative changes in body chemistry. To gain insight into your anger or depression, it is probably a good idea to get a journal or notebook and keep a running list of things that you believe are causing you to feel this way. By externalising what you are feeling, you can give your emotions a more concrete display and you can examine them.

One way to cope with menopause is to join a support group. Since every woman will one day endure menopause, there are plenty of groups available where women can share their experiences with others like them. Not all women experience significant mood changes, however, many do. It is important to speak to others who may be going through the same trials and tribulations as you are.

In addition, it is a good idea to explore methods of keeping yourself at ease and reducing stress and anxiety. Think about heading to a day spa, getting a massage, floating in a pool, meditation, purchasing a relaxation tape, taking a warm bath, learning breathing exercises, and taking up yoga.

If you have never heard of the Bach remedies, it may be a good idea to check them out. When you take Larch, Wild Rose, Gorse and Gentian together, it may help alleviate some of the symptoms of depression. There are many holistic remedies available that have provided excellent results.

You can also look into aromatherapy and acupuncture, which not only can provide relief from symptoms of menopause – they can also help you feel better all around. Hypnosis is also an interesting avenue to explore. Through hypnosis you may be able to eliminate some of the behaviors that are troubling you. Hydrotherapy, light therapy, and sound therapy are also treatments that may help you feel better and give you the peace of mind to combat the emotional symptoms of menopause.

If you are depressed for an extended period of time it is suggested that you contact a mental health professional such as a psychologist. Just a few sessions of counselling may help you get in touch with your feelings and realize that they are essentially a reaction to hormonal fluctuations. While it may be difficult to control at all times, encountering your issues up close and personally may give you the strength to overcome them.

Anger and depression are common symptoms of menopause. With help, knowledge, and support you can overcome them. There is no reason that you have to remain feeling angry and depressed for an extended period of time. You owe it to yourself to take control of your situation by seeking the help that you need or implementing coping strategies. Waiting around for things to get better won't change a thing and will probably make your life and the lives of those around you more difficult.

Published At: www.Isnare.com

Parent Category: Disorders
Category: Depression

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